Upcoming Events
Nov 09

Human Rights Book Club

November 9 @ 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Boise ID
United States
Mar 23

Pedals and Packs Service Project

March 23, 2018 - March 31, 2018
Boise ID
United States

The Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial has been officially accepted and recognized as a “Site of Conscience.”

 

The operating principles for the International Coalition of Sites of Conscience include:

Located along the Greenbelt in downtown Boise, the Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial opened in 2002 as an educational park designed to engage visitors to reflect, think and engage one another on human rights issues. Both the triumphs and tragedies of the human story are on display, but in every quote and every idea, we see the profound power of a single voice or bold action to overcome great odds and alter the course of history.

 

The Memorial includes a life-sized bronze statue of Anne Frank as she peers out an open window. The walls of the Memorial contain over 60 quotes from the world’s humanitarian leaders. Water features combine with serene landscaping to create a quiet and welcoming place for thought and inspiration. An expansion project is underway to add even more features to the park. Learn more about the expansion here.

 

The Memorial is the only Anne Frank Memorial in the United States and one of the few places in the world where the full Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is on permanent, public display.

 

To read the 30 Articles in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) and the quotes featured in the Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial, please click to enter the Wassmuth Center’s Online Classroom.

 

Visiting the Memorial is free of charge, and is open to everyone.

Why an Anne Frank Memorial in Idaho?

The legacy Anne Frank left for human dignity is one that resonates strongly in Idaho.

 

In 1995, a traveling exhibit on Anne Frank drew in tens of thousands of visitors from around Idaho. This overwhelming interest sparked the idea for a more permanent tribute. Over the next several years, a group of community leaders, human rights stalwarts and citizens from across the state and the country worked tirelessly to bring the Memorial to life.

 

In 2002, their long-held vision was realized, and the Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial opened to the public. Since its opening, the Memorial has welcomed hundreds of thousands of visitors and students to better understand the human rights challenges our communities and world face today.